The Important Contribution of Rainwater Harvesting

Written by peter@uwcs.com.au

August 7, 2021

The Important Contribution of Rainwater Harvesting

Professor Peter J Coombes

Many places across North America, Australia and the planet are experiencing significant drought. For those who are not connected to city water, paying attention to water levels is critical. As efforts to conserve water ramp up, today we are sharing the foreword written by Peter J. Coombes for the Essential Rainwater Harvesting: A Guide To Home-Scale System Design to remind us that harvesting rainwater has been an important source of water catchment for a very long time.

Forward by Peter J Coombes: the importance of Rainwater Harvesting in Essential Rainwater Harvesting

The author has operated a sustainable house for over 20 years. See the article describing the  Long term performance of a sustainable house that sources solar energy and rainwater first with backup from the centralised grid. A combination of rainwater and solar battery storage results in long term mains water use of less than 50 Litres/day (currently zero litres/day) and long term energy use is less than 4 kWh/day.

About
Dr Peter Coombes

Dr Coombes has spent more than 30 years dedicated to the development of systems understanding of the urban, rural and natural water cycles with a view to finding optimum solutions for the sustainable use of ecosystem services, provision of infrastructure and urban planning.

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